Catalog Home Page

Scaling digital walls: Everyday practices of consent and adaptation to digital architectural control

Best, K. and Tozer, N. (2013) Scaling digital walls: Everyday practices of consent and adaptation to digital architectural control. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 16 (4). pp. 401-417.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1367877912460618
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Users of mobile phones, computers and other digital media devices are increasingly confronted with what Lessig calls ‘architectural control’. This article presents results from a study which reveals that users adopt four tactics in negotiating architectural control: modifying use, modifying the technology, decreasing use and acceptance. Users consent in two ways: by internalizing control through incorporating architectural constraints into their embodied practice, and by responding to the convenience of architectural controls and the complexity of far-flung collective digital systems. Thus it is argued that modification and adaptation in everyday practices of digital media and information communication technologies (ICTs) is a type of consent rather than resistance to digital control.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Media, Communication and Culture
Publisher: Sage Publications
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/16098
Item Control Page Item Control Page