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Comparative spatial and temporal localisation of perlecan, aggrecan and type I, II and IV collagen in the ovine meniscus: an ageing study

Melrose, J., Smith, S., Cake, M., Read, R. and Whitelock, J. (2005) Comparative spatial and temporal localisation of perlecan, aggrecan and type I, II and IV collagen in the ovine meniscus: an ageing study. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 124 (3-4). pp. 225-235.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00418-005-0005-0
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Abstract

This is the first study to immunolocalise perlecan in meniscal tissues and to demonstrate how its localisation varied with ageing relative to aggrecan and type I, II and IV collagen. Perlecan was present in the middle and inner meniscal zones where it was expressed by cells of an oval or rounded morphology. Unlike the other components visualised in this study, perlecan was strongly cell associated and its levels fell significantly with age onset and cell number decline. The peripheral outer meniscal zones displayed very little perlecan staining other than in small blood vessels. Picrosirius red staining viewed under polarised light strongly delineated complex arrangements of slender discrete randomly oriented collagen fibre bundles as well as transverse, thick, strongly oriented, collagen tie bundles in the middle and outer meniscal zones. The collagen fibres demarcated areas of the meniscus which were rich in anionic toluidine blue positive proteoglycans; immunolocalisations confirmed the presence of aggrecan and perlecan. When meniscal sections were examined macroscopically, type II collagen localisation in the inner meniscal zone was readily evident in the 2- to 7-day-old specimens; this became more disperse in the older meniscal specimens. Type I collagen had a widespread distribution in all meniscal zones at all time points. Type IV collagen was strongly associated with blood vessels in the 2- to 7-day-old meniscal specimens but was virtually undetectable at the later time points (>7 month).

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © Springer-Verlag 2005
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/15547
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