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European origin of bradyrhizobium populations infecting lupins and serradella in soils of Western Australia and South Africa

Stepkowski, T., Moulin, L., Krzyzanska, A., McInnes, A., Law, I.J. and Howieson, J. (2005) European origin of bradyrhizobium populations infecting lupins and serradella in soils of Western Australia and South Africa. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 71 (11). pp. 7041-7052.

Free to read: http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.71.11.7041-7052.2005
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Abstract

We applied a multilocus phylogenetic approach to elucidate the origin of serradella and lupin Bradyrhizobium strains that persist in soils of Western Australia and South Africa. The selected strains belonged to different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR clusters that were distinct from RAPD clusters of applied inoculant strains. Phylogenetic analyses were performed with nodulation genes (nodA, nodZ, nolL, noeI), housekeeping genes (dnaK, recA, glnII, atpD), and 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer sequences. Housekeeping gene phytogenies revealed that all serradella and Lupinus cosentinii isolates from Western Australia and three of five South African narrow-leaf lupin strains were intermingled with the strains of Bradyrhizobium canariense, forming a well supported branch on each of the trees. All nodA gene sequences of the lupin and serradella bradyrhizobia formed a single branch, referred to as clade II, together with the sequences of other lupin and serradella strains. Similar patterns were detected in nodZ and nolL trees. In contrast, nodA sequences of the strains isolated from native Australian legumes formed either a new branch called clade IV or belonged to clade I or III, whereas their nonsymbiotic genes grouped outside the B. canariense branch. These data suggest that the lupin and serradella strains, including the strains from uncultivated L. cosentinii plants, are descendants of strains that most likely were brought from Europe accidentally with lupin and serradella seeds. The observed dominance of B. canariense strains may be related to this species' adaptation to acid soils common in Western Australia and South Africa and, presumably, to their intrinsic ability to compete for nodulation of lupins and serradella.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Rhizobium Studies
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
Copyright: © 2005, American Society for Microbiology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/15021
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