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Harnessing landholder’s knowledge for efficient environmental monitoring and management for new environmental markets: lessons from plantation forestry carbon sequestration in Western Australia

McHenry, M.P. (2013) Harnessing landholder’s knowledge for efficient environmental monitoring and management for new environmental markets: lessons from plantation forestry carbon sequestration in Western Australia. In: Ren, H., McHenry, M.P. and Loaiza Usuga, J.C., (eds.) Plantations: biodiversity, carbon sequestration, and restoration. Nova Science Publishers, Hauppauge, New York, USA, pp. 77-98.

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Abstract

Leveraging limited environmental monitoring and management funding using landholder knowledge and capacity can reduce total costs of implementing plantation forestry environmental market mechanisms by both reducing duplication and enhancing on-ground activities to assimilate environmental and production system decisionmaking. This chapter explores the integration of high accuracy on-site vegetative and ecological methods and metrics (on-site verification, allometrics, expansion factors, carbon factors, root-to-shoot ratios, etc.) into landscape and macro-scale plantation carbon and land monitoring models to assist the development of innovative ecosystem service markets derived from forestry plantation and carbon sequestration developments. Several limitations of current methods and policies are outlined, requiring primarily information tools and communication pathways to redress, opening the possibility for formally capturing lifetimes of local landholder knowledge of forestry land use and environmental system changes. This work suggests parallel advancements of on-site landholder and remote land monitoring and management has the potential to achieve a multitude of efficiencies. These include: cost-effective skilled environmental management jobs in regional and remote areas; streamlined administration and research expenditures for on-site environmental monitoring and supporting costs (transport, accommodation, etc.); locally appropriate conservation activities sustained over time, and; direct communication between landholders, researchers, and policymakers.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Information Technology
Publisher: Nova Science Publishers
Copyright: © Nova Science Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/15015
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