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Modelling of water, sediment and phosphorus runoff: implications for grain cropping in southwest Australia

Anderson, G., Bell, R., Chen, W. and Brennan, R. (2010) Modelling of water, sediment and phosphorus runoff: implications for grain cropping in southwest Australia. In: Gilkes RJ, Prakongkep N, editors. Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science; Soil Solutions for a Changing World; Published on DVD; http://www.iuss.org, 1 - 6 August, Brisbane, Australia, pp 236-239 pp. 236-239.

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Abstract

Fertiliser decision support systems are widely used for making phosphorus (P) fertiliser recommendations. However, the current decision support systems do not provide an environmental assessment (e.g. P runoff) of the P fertiliser recommendation. This paper outlines the three modelling components required for fertiliser decision support systems to predict P runoff. The first component considers water runoff and is directed at calculating runoff volume (Qsurf) and peak runoff rate (qpeak). The second component makes predictions of soil erosion, sediment yield (SED), using the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE). Runoff volume and peak runoff rate predictions are used in the second component to calculate sediment yield. The third component makes predictions of P runoff by calculating the amount of dissolved and particulate P runoff. Dissolved P runoff is calculated using runoff volume and the water soluble P contents of the soil, fertiliser and manures. Particulate P runoff is calculated using runoff volume, sediment yield and total P content of the soil, fertiliser and manure. Total annual P runoff is the sum of dissolved and particulate P runoff for each individual water runoff event. It is argued that all three components are required for a decision support system to accurately predict P runoff. The implications of this approach are considered for grain cropping areas in the mediterranean climate of southwest Australia.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/14801
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