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The subject of law

Frow, J. (1987) The subject of law. In: Wickham, G., (ed.) Social Theory and Legal Politics. Local Consumption Publications, Sydney, Australia, pp. 68-74.

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Abstract

This paper is part of a larger piece of work on juridical discourse in which I try to elaborate a general description of the discursive and interdiscursive structures of the law and to specify some of the central doctrinal categories of contemporary law. The category of legal subject has an exemplary status in such a project for a number of reasons: it is constructed, in historically differential ways, through a diversity of overlapping positions in legal and para-legal practices and languages; it covers both human and non-human entities; it is formed in direct relation to the juridical/economic concept of property; and it is closely linked, as both foundation and effect, to the philosophical category of subject. My account here is necessarily cursory, but it should be apparent that it has implications, in part, for the broader debate that has taken place in recent years around the concept of the subject.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Humanities
Publisher: Local Consumption Publications
Copyright: © John Frow
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/14235
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