Catalog Home Page

Sudden forest canopy collapse corresponding with extreme drought and heat in a mediterranean-type eucalypt forest in southwestern Australia

Matusick, G., Ruthrof, K.X., Brouwers, N.C., Dell, B. and Hardy, G.E.St.J. (2013) Sudden forest canopy collapse corresponding with extreme drought and heat in a mediterranean-type eucalypt forest in southwestern Australia. European Journal of Forest Research, 132 (3). pp. 497-510.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Authors' Version
Download (1MB)
Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10342-013-0690-5
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

Drought and heat-induced forest dieback and mortality are emerging global concerns. Although Mediterranean-type forest (MTF) ecosystems are considered to be resilient to drought and other disturbances, we observed a sudden and unprecedented forest collapse in a MTF in Western Australia corresponding with record dry and heat conditions in 2010/2011. An aerial survey and subsequent field investigation were undertaken to examine: the incidence and severity of canopy dieback and stem mortality, associations between canopy health and stand-related factors as well as tree species response. Canopy mortality was found to be concentrated in distinct patches, representing 1.5 % of the aerial sample (1,350 ha). Within these patches, 74 % of all measured stems (>1 cm DBHOB) had dying or recently killed crowns, leading to 26 % stem mortality six months following the collapse. Patches of canopy collapse were more densely stocked with the dominant species, Eucalyptus marginata, and lacked the prominent midstorey species Banksia grandis, compared to the surrounding forest. A differential response to the disturbance was observed among co-occurring tree species, which suggests contrasting strategies for coping with extreme water stress. These results suggest that MTFs, once thought to be resilient to climate change, are susceptible to sudden and severe forest collapse when key thresholds have been reached.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Copyright: © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/13473
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year