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Comparison of seed yield and quality of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars in low fertility soils and their response to boron and complete fertilizer

Keerati-Kasikorn, P., Bell, R.W., Panya, P., Gilmour, R. and Loneragan, J.F. (1993) Comparison of seed yield and quality of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars in low fertility soils and their response to boron and complete fertilizer. In: Barrow, N.J., (ed.) Plant nutrition : from genetic engineering to field practice : proceedings of the Twelfth International Plant Nutrition Colloquium, 21-26 September 1993, Perth. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, pp. 409-412.

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Abstract

Seed yield of 14 peanut cultivars grown on a low-fertility soil with no fertilizer (Nil), complete fertilizer (All) and complete Fertilizer except boron (Bo) was determined. Seed yields varied widely among cultivars in each fertilizer treatment, ranging from about 700 kg dry matter (DM) ha-1 to 2100 in Nil, 200 to 2100 in All-B, and 800 to 3300 in All. The relative ranking of cvs by seed DM also varied widely among treatments. When their relative seed yields in all treatments were classified by cluster analysis, the cvs formed four distinct groups Group 1-high yields in all treatments (2 cultivars): Group 2-low yields in all treatments (3 cultivars); Group 3-intermediate yields in all treatments (6 cultivars); Group 4-intermediate yield in Nil, low in Bo, high in All (3 cultivars).

Over all treatments, pod number was the most important, single yield-determining character, explaining 41% of the variation in seed weight. Other contributing factors were percentage of large seed (31%), seed number per pod (5%), and average seed weight (7%).

The large differences in the adaptation of cultivars to soil nutrient levels could be exploited in peanut breeding programs. That Group I cultivars, achieved high yield in all treatments suggests that it should be possible to breed for both adaptation to low fertility and for responsiveness to high fertility in a single cultivar.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological and Environmental Sciences
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/13002
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