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The role of the fungicide phosphite to control Phytophthora cinnamomi in native plant communities within or adjacent to mining activities

Holmes, J., Hardy, G., Wilkinson, C., Tynan, K., Dell, B. and Colquhoun, I. (1997) The role of the fungicide phosphite to control Phytophthora cinnamomi in native plant communities within or adjacent to mining activities. In: 11th Biennial Conference of the Australasian Plant Pathology Society, 29 September - 2 October, Perth, Western Australia.

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Abstract

P. cinnamomi is a major plant pathogen of native plant communities in Western Australia. It affects approximately 14% of the northern jarrah (Eucalyptus marginata) forest in Western Australia and over 2000 of the 9000 plant species in the Banksia woodlands and heathlands of the south-west of Western Australia. Mining operations and timber harvesting are major activities in areas where dieback is prevalent both as continuous fronts and spot infections. The presence of P. cinnamomi in and around mining operations increases the financial cost for most mines. Hence, the development of a method to contain or eradicate the fungus will be a great financial advantage to mining companies.

Fungicides have rarely been used to control diseases in native plant communities due to high cost and phytotoxic responses but recent research has shown that neutralised phosphorus acid (phosphite) has value in conservation of rare and endangered plant species in the south-west of Western Australia.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological and Environmental Sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/12990
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