Catalog Home Page

US military, airspace, and meteorological radar system impacts from utility class wind turbines: Implications for renewable energy targets and the wind industry

Auld, T., McHenry, M.P. and Whale, J. (2013) US military, airspace, and meteorological radar system impacts from utility class wind turbines: Implications for renewable energy targets and the wind industry. Renewable Energy, 55 . pp. 24-30.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Authors' Version
Download (183kB)
Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.renene.2012.12.008
*Subscription may be required

Abstract

A substantial number of wind energy projects have been stalled or abandoned in the United States of America (US) due to concerns over the effects of wind turbines on radar installations. Between 2008 and 2010, military, airspace, or meteorological radar concerns in the US contributed to the delay or abandonment of an estimated 20,000 MW of wind energy capacity. These delays are a likely major factor influencing the current US Administration's failure to double non-hydro renewable generation from 2008 to 2011; a target stated by the US President in a joint session address to Congress in February 2009. The delays are also a threat to the US Department of Energy's target to produce 20% of electricity from wind energy by 2030 – unless radar-related barriers are mitigated. This work includes interviews with two senior representatives, from the US Department of Defence (DOD) and the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), discussing the nature of concerns pertaining to the effects of wind turbines on radar and military/aviation in the US alongside approaches that have been trialled that aim to resolve such concerns. This research finds that the Energy Siting Clearing House, established within the DOD to review delayed wind farm projects, has brought much needed coordination to the approval process. A key challenge for any review body, however, will be to deliver an objective outcome that is not overturned by alternative political agendas. Integral to the success of any approach will be a sufficient capacity and mandate to facilitate the technical and non-technical cross-disciplinary and interagency research generating a balance between military, airspace, meteorological, and wind energy industry/political objectives.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Energy
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/12965
Item Control Page Item Control Page

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year