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High altitude solar water heater bathing center: renewable energy utilised for a remote and impoverished Himalayan village in Humla Nepal

Zahnd, A. and Avishek, M. (2006) High altitude solar water heater bathing center: renewable energy utilised for a remote and impoverished Himalayan village in Humla Nepal. In: Solar2006 44th ANZSES Annual Conference, 13 - 15 September, Canberra, Australia

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Abstract

This paper aims to highlight the importance and need for High Altitude Solar Water Heaters (HASWH) for poor, remote communities in order to improve their hygiene conditions. It draws attention to the utilisation of the abundant, locally available solar energy resource, as a sustainable source of energy for the poorest of the poor in the remote Himalayan communities. It emphasises that improved personal hygiene, through appropriate applied renewable energy technologies, is an important and integral part of people’s appropriate and sustainable holistic development. In addition it is an effective preventative medical treatment for people in such communities. This paper discusses the results of the first two years of service of the 1st generation HASWH, including, its shortcomings and need for improvements. It discusses the details of the 2nd generation HASWH which has provided, since November 2005, encouraging and satisfactory results, and is now a part of an installed and holistic community development project in the village of Dhadhaphaya in Humla. It includes the data collected under defined climate conditions, presented through diagrams and graphs; the first practical experiences obtained by the project implementing High Altitude Research Station (HARS) staff and the local community; and the lessons learned and possible further improvements and developments of this technology.

Publication Type: Conference Paper
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/12920
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