Catalog Home Page

Warren L. Sausser, D.C.: Influence unrecognized

Young, K.J. (1997) Warren L. Sausser, D.C.: Influence unrecognized. Chiropractic History, 17 (1). pp. 75-83.

Abstract

Warren L. Sausser is a name that is almost unknown in mainstream chiropractic, yet his work has affected all chiropractors. A source of great controversy, the fourteen by thirty-six inch full-spine, weight-bearing x-ray changed chiropractic forever, due in large part to the dynamism of Dr. Sausser. He also developed the first full-body twenty by seventy-two inch x-ray for biomechanical analysis. Dr. Sausser was a founding member of the New York State Spinographic Association as well as the Board of Counselors of Spinographers and X-Ray Operators, which would later evolve into today's American Chiropractic College of Radiology. Sausser added significantly to the radiographic literature of the day. Editor of the National Chiropractic Association's "Spinograph and X-ray" column for five years and a prolific contributor to the Journal of the National Chiropractic Association throughout his career, he was a tremendous proponent of research. Dr. Sausser also fought passionately for the identity and independence of chiropractic, first in the Army, where he was an x-ray technician, and later in the New York State courts. The result of the latter battle eventually allowed him to become the first chiropractor licensed to operate an x-ray laboratory in New York. Unfortunately, Dr. Sausser's devotion to his duty had serious negative consequences for him personally, contributing to two divorces and eventually, like so many early pioneers of radiation to his death in 1958, at the age of sixty-three.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Association for the History of Chiropractic
Copyright: 1997 Association for the History of Chiropractic
Publishers Website: http://www.historyofchiropractic.org/the-journal
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/12728
Item Control Page Item Control Page