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Development of a two-step nested duplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of Brachyspira pilosicoli and Brachyspira intermedia in chicken faeces

Phillips, N.D., La, T. and Hampson, D.J. (2006) Development of a two-step nested duplex PCR assay for the rapid detection of Brachyspira pilosicoli and Brachyspira intermedia in chicken faeces. Veterinary Microbiology, 116 (1-3). pp. 239-245.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2006.03.020
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Abstract

Avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS) is an infection of the caeca and/or colo-rectum of laying and meat breeder hens caused by anaerobic intestinal spirochaetes of the genus Brachyspira. AIS can result in a variety of symptoms, including delayed and/or reduced egg production, and increased faecal water content. The two most commonly reported Brachyspira species involved in AIS are Brachyspira pilosicoli and Brachyspira intermedia, and their detection and identification can be difficult and time consuming. In the current study a two-step nested duplex PCR (2S-N-D-PCR) was developed for the detection of these two species, using DNA extracted from washed chicken faeces. In the first step, a duplex PCR (D-PCR) amplifying Brachyspira genus-specific portions of the 16S rRNA and NADH oxidase (nox) genes was undertaken on the washed faeces. In the second step, a nested D-PCR was used that amplified species-specific portions of the 16S rRNA gene of B. pilosicoli and the nox gene of B. intermedia from the amplicons produced in the first step. The 2S-N-D-PCR was rapid and specific, and could be used to detect approximately 103 cells of each spirochaete species per gram of washed faeces. When tested on 882 chicken faecal samples from infected flocks, it detected 4-5% more positive faecal samples than did the standard method of selective anaerobic culture followed by individual species-specific PCR assays conducted on the growth on the primary plate. The application of this new technique should improve diagnostic capacity, and facilitate further studies on AIS.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: Crown Copyright © 2006
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/9726
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