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Internal parasites and association with diarrhoea in sheep at an abattoir in Western Australia

Bath-Jacobson, C.L., Ryan, U.M., Robertson, I. and Besier, R.B. (2005) Internal parasites and association with diarrhoea in sheep at an abattoir in Western Australia. In: 6th International Sheep Veterinary Congress, 17 - 21 June, Crete, Greece.

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    Abstract

    Diarrhoea (scouring) is an important issue for the sheep meat industry. Scouring is a major risk factor for fleece soiling and consequential carcase contamination with microbes that cause meat spoilage and potential dangers for humans (2). There is little information on the causes of scouring in sheep at slaughter. Strongyle worm infections are commonly implicated in scouring and reduced production, yet there is no published data quantifying strongyle infections in scouring and normal sheep at abattoirs. In addition, Giardia and Cryptosporidium have been associated with scouring in ruminants, but little is known about the prevalence, genotypes present or the effect on production in sheep populations. This study carried out at an abattoir in Western Australia (WA), aimed to investigate the extent of strongyle, Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections and any association with scouring in sheep.

    Publication Type: Conference Paper
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/9592
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