Catalog Home Page

Telling how texts talk: essays on reading and ethnomethodology

McHoul, A. (1982) Telling how texts talk: essays on reading and ethnomethodology. Routledge and Kegan Paul, London, England.

Google Books Preview: http://books.google.com.au/books/about/Telling_How...
*Open access. Some pages may not be available

Abstract

Two distinct but related things are going on in these essays. They try to give specific instances of how ethnomethodological studies of a particular variety of social subject, 'readings', might get underway. In treating textual exchange, these essays make a small contribution towards the extension of ethnomethodology's scope - an extension into that sphere of interaction lying beyond the purely 'face-to-face' domain. This is certainly no unique step. Indeed a corpus of relevant materials has begun to emerge quite recently (particularly Psathas, 1979b; Schenkein, 1979; Anderson and Sharrock, 1979)(1) Giving instantiations of reading-analytic work in ethnomethodology is the first thing, then.

The second is to examine ethnomethodology's relation to 'textuality' more generally; to pose problems for its analytic practice, for its conception of 'science'/'theory' and for its reliance upon the 'methodic' as a real order of events; and to pose those problems in relation to questions of 'reading' and 'text'.

These two aspects of the work need not be seen as distinct.

Publication Type: Book
Publisher: Routledge and Kegan Paul
Copyright: 1982 Alec McHoul
Notes: Series: The International library of phenomenology and moral sciences
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/9580
Item Control Page