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Neonatal immune responses to coagulase-negative staphylococci

Strunk, T., Richmond, P., Simmer, K., Currie, A., Levy, O. and Burgner, D. (2007) Neonatal immune responses to coagulase-negative staphylococci. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 20 (4). pp. 370-375.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/QCO.0b013e3281a7ec98
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Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Coagulase-negative staphylococci have emerged as the most common nosocomial pathogen in neonatal intensive care units worldwide. Our understanding of the interactions between coagulase-negative staphylococci and the immune system is incomplete, especially in the newborn. This review summarizes current knowledge on the human immune response to coagulase-negative staphylococci, with particular emphasis on the neonatal innate immune system. RECENT FINDINGS: There are very limited data on innate immune responses to coagulase-negative staphylococci in neonates. Levels of serum proteins, including transplacental anti-coagulase-negative staphylococci immunoglobulin and complement, correlate with gestational age, and this relative deficiency in preterm infants contributes to their suboptimal opsonization and impaired bacterial killing of coagulase-negative staphylococci. In adults, coagulase-negative staphylococci elicit significant cytokine responses in vitro, which are probably partly mediated by Toll-like receptors, including Toll-like receptor type 2, but these pathways have not been characterized in the high-risk neonatal population. SUMMARY: The susceptibility of human preterm neonates to coagulase-negative staphylococci relates partly to the immaturity of the neonatal immune response. Strategies to reduce the burden of coagulase-negative staphylococci infections require a thorough understanding of host-pathogen interactions, particularly the engagement of coagulase-negative staphylococci by the neonatal innate immune system.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Ltd.
Copyright: © 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/9538
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