Catalog Home Page

The electronic polis: Media democracy and the invasion of Iraq

Lewis, J. and Best, K. (2003) The electronic polis: Media democracy and the invasion of Iraq. Reconstruction: Studies in Contemporary Culture, 3 (3).

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (115kB) | Preview
    Link to Published Version: http://reconstruction.eserver.org/033/lewisbest.ht...
    *Open access, no subscription required

    Abstract

    The notion of "democracy" is a critical cultural and political referent for supporters and opponents of the recent invasion of Iraq. According to many analysts, the successful waging of war by a modern democratic state is contingent upon a tripartite consensus between the government, the media and public opinion. Democracy is pivotal in the formation of this consensus. In order to understand the status and authority of "democracy" we need to draw upon broader perspectives of the relationship between language and culture. The dialogue-dispute between Jacques Derrida and Martin Heidegger provides valuable insights into the ways in which language and media representation contribute to the formation of the preconditions of democratic consensus. Media representation is an unstable compound of images, information and cultural elements within a context of ongoing language wars. Democracy, as a highly contested discourse within these wars, needs to be re-defined and re-configured in order to restore its power and viability as a productive resource in the advance of contemporary cultural politics.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Copyright: 2003 The Authors
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/9302
    Item Control Page

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year