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A new era for restocking, stock enhancement and sea ranching of coastal fisheries resources

Bell, J.D., Leber, K.M., Blankenship, H.L., Loneragan, N.R. and Masuda, R. (2008) A new era for restocking, stock enhancement and sea ranching of coastal fisheries resources. Reviews in Fisheries Science, 16 (1-3). pp. 1-9.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10641260701776951
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Abstract

The growing number of countries investigating the potential for releasing cultured juveniles to augment coastal fisheries resulted in the First International Symposium on Stock Enhancement and Sea Ranching (ISSESR) in Norway in 1997. The 1st and 2nd ISSESR, in Japan in 2002, were instrumental in developing methods for mass production of environmentally fit juveniles and for releasing them in responsible ways. The 3rd ISSESR, held in the U.S.A. in 2006 (www.SeaRanching.org), ushered the discipline into a new era. The major advances included: (1) definitions of the various objectives for releasing cultured juveniles (restocking, stock enhancement, and sea ranching); (2) a framework for integrating releases within their fisheries management context, including tools for quantitative assessment; (3) a systematic, transparent, and stakeholder-participatory planning process to determine whether releases have a cost-effective role to play in managing a fishery; (4) a comprehensive case study (blue crabs in Chesapeake Bay) describing the multi-disciplinary approach needed to evaluate the potential benefits of releases; and (5) a suite of other lessons to guide stakeholders in evaluating the potential for and implementation of releases. The papers in this Special Issue of Reviews in Fisheries Science elaborate how restocking, stock enhancement and sea ranching programs can create synergies between aquaculture and some coastal fisheries to help meet the future demand for seafood and aid in restoring depleted stocks.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Fish and Fisheries Research
School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Copyright: 2008 Taylor and Francis Group LLC
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8973
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