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Endothelial function in HIV-infected patients receiving protease inhibitor therapy: does immune competence affect cardiovascular risk?

Nolan, D., Watts, G.F., Herrmann, S.E., French, M.A., John, M. and Mallal, S. (2003) Endothelial function in HIV-infected patients receiving protease inhibitor therapy: does immune competence affect cardiovascular risk? QJM, 96 (11). pp. 825-832.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/qjmed/hcg145
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Abstract

Background: The use of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) as a component of combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients has been associated with dyslipidaemia, but its significance as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease is unclear. Endothelial dysfunction is an early phase of atherogenesis that may be assessed non-invasively with ultrasonography in vivo. Aim: To evaluate vascular function and investigate potential determinants of endothelial dysfunction of the peripheral circulation in PI-treated, HIV-infected men with dyslipidaemia. Design: Observational, case-control study. Methods: We studied 24 HIV-infected, PI-treated men with dyslipidaemia and 24 normolipidaemic, healthy male controls matched for age and body mass index. Brachial artery endothelial function was studied using high-resolution ultrasound and computerized edge-detection software. This non-invasive technique measured post-ischaemic flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and the endothelium-independent vasodilatory response to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN). Results: Within the HIV patient group, FMD was significantly associated with percentage of 'naïve' CD4 + 45RA + T cells (p=0.03), while plasma lipid/lipoprotein and insulin levels, body mass, and smoking status did not correlate with endothelial function. FMD was not significantly different between the study group and the controls. Conclusions: The atherogenic potential of PI-associated dyslipidaemia may be attenuated in HIV-infected patients with decreased immune competence, reflecting a possible contribution of cell-mediated immune responses to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Clinical Immunology and Biomedical Statistics
Publisher: Oxford University Press
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8836
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