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Quantifying fishing effort: A synthesis of current methods and their applications

McCluskey, S.M. and Lewison, R.L. (2008) Quantifying fishing effort: A synthesis of current methods and their applications. Fish and Fisheries, 9 (2). pp. 188-200.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-2979.2008.00283.x
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Abstract

The need to accurately quantify fishing effort has increased in recent years as fisheries have expanded around the world and many fish stocks and non-target species are threatened with collapse. Quantification methods vary greatly among fisheries, and to date there has not been a comprehensive review of these methods. Here we review existing approaches to quantify fishing effort in small-scale, recreational, industrial, and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fisheries. We present the strengths and limitations of existing methods, identifying the most robust methods and the critical knowledge gaps that must be addressed to improve our ability to quantify and map fishing effort. Although identifying the ‘best’ method ultimately depends on the intended application of the data, in general, quantification methods that are based on information on gear use and spatial distribution offer the best approaches to representing fishing effort on a broad scale. Integrating fisher’s knowledge and involving fishers in data collection and management decisions may be the most effective way to improve data quality and accessibility.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Copyright: 2008 The Authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8826
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