Catalog Home Page

Modernity's paradox and the structural determinants of child health and well-being

Li, J., McMurray, A. and Stanley, F. (2008) Modernity's paradox and the structural determinants of child health and well-being. Health Sociology Review, 17 (1). pp. 64-77.

Abstract

The decline in indicators of human development linked to rising social inequalities, despite post-modern society's unprecedented economic prosperity, has been called 'modernity's paradox' (Keating and Hertzman 1999). Scholars of developmental health suggest that micro-level influences from the social, economic and psychological circumstances in early life may explain social inequalities across the lifespan. However, children's poor developmental and health outcomes are also a product of the wider contexts of their lives. This paper extends the human developmental framework by linking the proximal determinants of health and well-being with macro-level forces. It reviews recent changes in the political, economic and social environments in developed countries, to provide insights into the recent trends in poor outcomes in children and youth, which remain paradoxical given the expectations of economic prosperity and the advances in medical and other technologies. The paper concludes with policy and research recommendations to reduce social disparities in child outcomes.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Nursing & Midwifery
Publisher: Flinders University
Copyright: 2008 eContent Mangement Pty Ltd.
Publishers Website: http://hsr.e-contentmanagement.com/archives/vol/17...
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8420
Item Control Page