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Predictors of study management and performance on a First-year computer course: The significance of students' study goals and perceptions

Styles, I.M. and Volet, S.E. (1995) Predictors of study management and performance on a First-year computer course: The significance of students' study goals and perceptions. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 8 (4). pp. 423-449.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.2190/3R3R-HL3Q-VRWY-HN20
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Abstract

This study investigated the significance of adult students' goals and perceptions in a first-year computer course, in relation to their study management and final performance. The relationship of goals to students' stable characteristics such as age, gender, levels of previous experience of computing and programs of study were examined. The results support the importance of personal goals with respect to achievement and the dynamic interactions between students' study goals and their subjective appraisals of their study. The best predictors of goals were students' perceptions of their interest in the course in the first half of the semester and of their competence in the second half. Background knowledge in computing was related to performance, but students' perceptions and goals were better predictors of performance. It is argued that students' cognitive and affective appraisals of their study and their individual goals are crucial factors in understanding individual differences in achievement in a first-year computer course.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Education
Publisher: Baywood Publishing
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8379
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