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Culture-specific care for indigenous people: a primary health care perspective

McMurray, A. and Param, R. (2008) Culture-specific care for indigenous people: a primary health care perspective. Contemporary Nurse, 28 (1-2). pp. 165-172.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.5172/conu.673.28.1-2.165
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Abstract

This article argues that a primary health care approach is an appropriate conceptual framework for addressing the health needs of Indigenous people. Primary health care is strategic, focusing on equity, access, empowerment and intersectoral partnerships as essential elements for maintaining health. Stereotypical notions of Indigenous ill health as being embedded in a general view of 'culture' can mitigate against achieving equity, access to health care and ultimately self-determinism. Because health is embedded in the social conditions of people's lives, the emphasis in Indigenous health care should first address Indigenous social disadvantage and ways of working in partnership with various groups of Indigenous people to achieve their health goals. A critical multicultural approach situates cultural differences within the wider nexus of power relations, and helps overcome the negative stereotyping that often prevents inclusive, self-determined care. Recommendations are suggested for change at the societal, professional and individual level.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Nursing & Midwifery
Publisher: eContent Management Pty Ltd
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8282
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