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Effects of potassium (K) supply on plant growth, potassium uptake and grain yield in wheat grown in grey sand

Ma, Q., Bell, R., Brennan, R. and Scanlan, C. (2011) Effects of potassium (K) supply on plant growth, potassium uptake and grain yield in wheat grown in grey sand. In: 2011 WA Agribusiness Crop Updates, 23 - 24 February, Perth, Western Australia.

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    Abstract

    In south-western Western Australia, the incidence of potassium (K) deficiency in wheat has increased steadily, with two-thirds of the arable lands prone to potassium depletion through continued removal in hay or grain and straw. Leaching of potassium especially in sandy soils, where the total potassium pool is small, is also a significant contributor to poor K-use efficiency in farming systems. Adequate K supply is required for obtaining high crop yield and quality and enhancing the efficiency of other nutrients and the ability of plants to tolerate stresses from soil moisture, salinity, temperature, disease and pests. In this study wheat was grown in grey sand in a glasshouse and treated with six levels of soil potassium supply to assess plant responses during the growing season in terms of plant growth, potassium uptake and yield components.

    Publication Type: Conference Paper
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8275
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