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Role of Australian digging mammals in ecosystem health

Valentine, L., Anderson, H., Hardy, G. and Fleming, T. (2011) Role of Australian digging mammals in ecosystem health. Research Findings 2011: Bulletin No. 3 .

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    Abstract

    Mammals that move or manipulate soil for food or to create shelter can completely change the biotic and abiotic characteristics of their habitat, potentially creating multiple benefits to the overall health of the ecosystem. The main digging mammals within Australia, bandicoots and bettongs, create small, conical-shaped holes while foraging for underground fungi, earthworms and tubers. The majority of Australian digging mammals have undergone drastic range and populati on contractions within the last 100 years. Where ecosystems have lost digging mammals, key processes may be reduced and this may contribute to declines in ecosystem health. Our project will investigate the ecological impacts of mammal foraging pits on soil condition, water infiltration, seedling recruitment, fungi dispersal and fire dynamics.

    Publication Type: Others
    Murdoch Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health
    Publisher: Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8251
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