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The distribution and abundance of kangaroos in relation to environment in Western Australia

Short, J., Caughley, G., Grice, D. and Brown, B. (1983) The distribution and abundance of kangaroos in relation to environment in Western Australia. Australian Wildlife Research, 10 (3). pp. 435-451.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WR9830435
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Abstract

During the winter of 1981, almost all kangaroo range within the State was surveyed, to provide an estimate of 980 000 reds and 436 000 greys. Densities were much lower than those of the eastern States. Red kangaroos Macropus rufus were most abundant in mulga shrubland, chenopod shrubland and tussock grassland, and least abundant in hummock grassland. Densities were associated strongly with land-use category being high in areas used for extensive sheep grazing and low in vacant Crown Land and arable land. Western grey kangaroos M. fuliginosa were confined to the south and west of the state, their distribution being related more directly to climate than to vegetation or land use. They live in the winter rainfall zone. Their restricted breeding season probably results in peak nutritional demands associated with lactation, and hence energy requirements, being synchronized with the spring flush of pasture following winter rains. About 14% of the red kangaroo and 8% of the western grey kangaroo populations in Western Australia were harvested legally in 1981

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Copyright: © CSIRO 1983
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/8112
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