Catalog Home Page

Indigenous service providers' perspectives on anger programs

Mals, P., Howells, K., Day, A. and Hall, G. (2009) Indigenous service providers' perspectives on anger programs. In: Day, A., Nakata, M. and Howells, K., (eds.) Anger and indigenous men: Understanding and responding to violent behavoiur. Federation Press, Leichardt, N.S.W, pp. 31-36.

Google Books Preview: http://books.google.com.au/books/about/Anger_and_i...
*Open access. Some pages may not be available

Abstract

Drawing on interviews with human services workers with experience in the design and delivery of rehabilitation programs for Indigenous male offenders, this chapter examines how cultural differences, attitudes towards program facilitators, literacy and other factors can affect program delivery, and how programs can become more responsive to participants' needs. It presents an outline of characteristics common to Indigenous men referred to anger management programs, including low self esteem and a sense of frustration, anger and powerlessness, especially in young, urban Aborigines and mostly in response to social and economic marginalisation. The authors identify triggers or contextual factors implicated in violence, including interfamily feuds, jealousy within intimate relationships and alcohol intoxication. The chapter discusses various issues that may affect the participation of Indigenous men in anger management programs, and ways in which the issues may affect rehabilitation outcomes.

Publication Type: Book Chapter
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Law
Publisher: Federation Press
Copyright: 2009 The Authors
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7855
Item Control Page