Catalog Home Page

Comparisons of breeding systems between two sympatric species, Nastanthus spathulatus (Calyceraceae) and Rhodophiala rhodolirion (Amaryllidaceae), in the high Andes of central Chile

Ladd, P.G. and Arroyo, M.T.K. (2009) Comparisons of breeding systems between two sympatric species, Nastanthus spathulatus (Calyceraceae) and Rhodophiala rhodolirion (Amaryllidaceae), in the high Andes of central Chile. Plant Species Biology, 24 (1). pp. 2-10.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Authors' Version
Download (380kB) | Preview
    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1442-1984.2009.00234.x
    *Subscription may be required

    Abstract

    Alpine vegetation occurs over a wide range of ecological conditions. Thus, the breeding systems of alpine plants are likely to be diverse and vary from one geographical area to another. The reproductive characteristics of Nastanthus spathulatus (Calyceraceae) and Rhodophiala rhodolirion (Amaryllidaceae), species with contrasting floral morphology, were studied in the high Andes of Chile, which has a Mediterranean-type climate. Natural and supplemental open pollination, and cross pollination and self-pollination trials were carried out in the field. Flower visitors were quantified by field and video observations. Both species had high outcrossing properties, and Nastanthus was strongly self-incompatible. Rhodophiala could form some seed by self-pollination, but fruit and seed sets were much lower after self-pollination compared with outcrossing. The phenology and flower/inflorescence forms of these species supported the view that alpine flowers are comparatively long lived and that the floral display contributes to a large proportion of the plant biomass. Rhodophiala was well attended by a native bee species (Megachile sauleyi) that was appropriately sized for efficient pollination. Although no flower visitors were observed on Nastanthus and wind pollination was discarded experimentally, a high proportion of the flowers produced seeds under natural pollination. Therefore, the seed set was not severely pollen limited in these species. Including previously published information, breeding systems are now known for 12 species on this Mediterranean alpine site and current knowledge suggests an emphasis on outcrossing breeding systems.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
    Copyright: © 2009 The Society for the Study of Species Biology
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7854
    Item Control Page

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year