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Prevalence and molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia species in pre-weaned sheep in Australia

Yang, R., Jacobson, C., Gordon, C. and Ryan, U. (2009) Prevalence and molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia species in pre-weaned sheep in Australia. Veterinary Parasitology, 161 (1-2). pp. 19-24.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2008.12.021
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    Abstract

    A total of 477 faecal samples from pre-weaned sheep from 5 different farms in the south west of Western Australia were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia using PCR. There were substantial differences in prevalence between the farms and overall prevalence was 24.5% and 11.1%, respectively for Cryptosporidium and Giardia. At the 18S locus, 66 Cryptosporidium positives were identified, the majority of which were C. bovis (n = 52), followed by the cervid genotype (n = 10) and C. parvum (n = 2). At a second diagnostic locus, using C. parvum and C. hominis-specific qPCR primers, 63 C. parvum positives were identified, some of which were co-infections with C. bovis. The C. parvum/C. hominis qPCR was more sensitive than the nested 18S PCR at detecting C. parvum. This may be due to the low numbers of oocysts present, as quantitation data indicated that all the C. parvum detected were present in low numbers (1-10 oocysts). It may also be that using C. parvum-specific primers is necessary to determine the true prevalence of C. parvum. Amongst Giardia positive isolates, G. duodenalis genotype E (livestock) was the most prevalent (36/53), with G. duodenalis genotype A detected in five positive isolates. There were also 11 mixed A and E infections detected. The findings of the present study indicate that pre-weaned lambs are not an important source of zoonotic Giardia genotypes in Australia but may be an important source of zoonotic Cryptosporidium.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Copyright: © 2009 Elsevier B.V.
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7644
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