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Parasite diversity and anthelmintic resistance in two herds of horses

Young, K.E., Garza, V., Snowden, K., Dobson, R.J., Powell, D. and Craig, T.M. (1999) Parasite diversity and anthelmintic resistance in two herds of horses. Veterinary Parasitology, 85 (2-3). pp. 205-214.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-4017(99)00100-4
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Abstract

Cyathostomes were the predominant group of worms present in both herds. Trichostrongylus axei was seen in both herds, but Strongylus equinus, Strongylus vulgaris, Gyalocephalus capitatus, Poteriostomum spp. and Strongyloides westeri were only found in the feral horses. Larvae of Strongylus edentatus were found in a single domesticated horse. Fecal egg reduction tests with the domesticated herd showed a 32% egg count reduction for fenbendazole, a 93% reduction with pyrantel, and a 99% reduction with ivermectin. From the LDA, anthelmintic resistance was evaluated by determining the resistance ratio of the domesticated herd compared with the feral herd. For benzimidazoles in the domesticated herd, 45% of the cyathostome population was 9.4 times more tolerant than the feral herd's parasite population. The parasite population in the domesticated herd was 1.5 times more tolerant to Levamisole, and 1.7 times more tolerant to the benzimidazole/levamisole combination than the parasite population within the feral herd. 9% of the parasite population in the domesticated herd was 90 times more tolerant to avermectins than the feral herd's parasite population, even though a subpopulation of worms in the feral herd were tolerant to low concentrations of avermectins despite never being previously exposed to this class of anthelmintic.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Copyright: © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7610
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