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Detailing the policy interactions between the Queensland solar bonus scheme and the small-scale renewable energy scheme, including the solar credits multiplier, while detailing the social, economic and environmental effects of these schemes

Barry, Elise Kristen (2011) Detailing the policy interactions between the Queensland solar bonus scheme and the small-scale renewable energy scheme, including the solar credits multiplier, while detailing the social, economic and environmental effects of these schemes. Honours thesis, Murdoch University.

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      Abstract

      The emergence in the need to evaluate the effectiveness of policies as a whole mix rather than evaluate the effectiveness of policies in isolation is becoming more useful as the policy environment becomes more crowded. This need is heightened considering the growing challenges of issues related to the sustainability of our energy resources. It’s optimal if energy policies are not restricted to suit only economic objectives but social and environmental objectives as well, to suit emerging concept of sustainability, as energy underpins all the activity within our economy and society. The analysis of policy interactions is a relatively new approach in determining and evaluating appropriate policy mixes, rather than focusing on the effectiveness of a single policy. Sorrell (2003) has developed a systematic process for developing policy options by breaking them down into different categories for comparison. Oikonomou and Jepma (2008) have further built upon this framework in analysing policy interaction by establishing a qualitative framework as part of their methodology. The Queensland Solar Bonus Scheme (QSBS) and Small-Scale Renewable Energy Scheme (SRES) have similar objectives of increasing the implementation of small-scale renewable energy technologies. This dissertation investigates the policy interactions between the QSBS and SRES using the frameworks provided by Sorrell (2003) and Oikonomou and Jepma (2008). The results find the majority of the interactions between these policies are complementary and non-duplicative. This research recommends two policy options which support their beneficial interactions outlined in the discussion. The first policy option assumes a reduction in the tariff rate for the QSBS whilst increasing the PV system limit to 10 kW. The second policy option assumes the same system limit increase to 10 kW plus a reduction in the tariff rate for non-peak full-tariff payments during peak demand to customers who have invested in battery storage.

      Publication Type: Thesis (Honours)
      Murdoch Affiliation: School of Engineering and Energy
      Supervisor: McHugh, Adam
      URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7609
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