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The caring attitude in nursing practice: a repertory grid study of trained nurses' perceptions

Morrison, P. (1991) The caring attitude in nursing practice: a repertory grid study of trained nurses' perceptions. Nurse Education Today, 11 (1). pp. 3-12.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0260-6917(91)90118-T
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Abstract

The process of caring is central to nursing practice but it remains a poorly defined concept in nursing practice and education. A small number of studies of caring in the field of nursing have been undertaken, but these have tended to be more quantitative in nature. This paper describes a qualitative study designed to explore nurses' perceptions of the concept of caring. Kelly's (1955) personal construct theory and the repertorygrid interview technique were used to elicit trainednurses' views about caring in relation to the practice of nursing. A strategic informant sample of 25 nurses was chosen. A total of 200 verbal descriptions (constructs) were generated from interviews, and these were analysed into similar content areas. Seven categories emerged from the analysis to provide a detailed description of caring. These include: a) personal qualities; b) clinical work style; c) interpersonal approach; d) level of motivation; e) concern for others; f) use of time; and g) attitudes. There were very few constructs related to physical aspects of care. The findings are offered as reflection of British nurses' perceptions of caring. Some possible applications of the results for nursing practice, education and research are considered.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: © 1991 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7556
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