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The Roosevelt years: Crucial milieu for Carl Rogers' innovation.

Barrett-Lennard, G.T. (2012) The Roosevelt years: Crucial milieu for Carl Rogers' innovation. History of Psychology, 15 (1). pp. 19-32.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0024168
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Abstract

This study explores broad features of political culture and event of the 1930s and World War 2 years, viewed in relation to the emergence and rapid early growth of the new therapy of Carl Rogers. The paper traces Rogers' early professional life and examines distinctive emphases in sociopolitical thought and development during Franklin D. Roosevelt's leadership as President over the prolonged emergency of the Great Depression and the crisis of the War. The study includes a focus on the President's own outlook and style, pertinent New Deal innovations, and wartime needs. Twelve features of this larger context are discriminated as together having vital importance for the new therapy and its founder. The congruent courses of the macrocontext and of Rogers' innovation are followed to the ending of Roosevelt's life. Direct causation is not attributed, but the evidence adduced newly points to particular contours of a larger environment favorable for the expression of Rogers' values and rare ability. In sum, the author concludes that a synergy of highly conducive historical circumstance and individual exceptionality contributed to the philosophical underpinnings, attitudinal values and early momentum of Rogers' client-centered therapy.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
Publisher: American Psychological Association
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7145
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