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Corporate philanthropy: Getting it right

Love, T. (2006) Corporate philanthropy: Getting it right. New Zealand Management, 53 (9). p. 59.

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Abstract

At a time when attacks on humanity - both human and natural - are so evident in the daily media, it is natural for people to consider how to prevent, or at least try to alleviate, social concerns. Such thought characterises the philanthropic nature. Like many developed countries, social issues besiege the quality of life. Failure of the education system, the lack of appropriate health services and deficient support for families, all present themselves as threats to the collective social well-being. Such issues escalate when government fails to act, forcing the community and voluntary sector to react. Michael Porter and Mark Kramer, co-founders of US-based non-profit organisation FSG, have suggested that Milton Friedman's view that corporations provide no greater benefit to society than is provided by individual donors, is only true when corporate contributions are unfocused. This, they claim, is because corporations can leverage capabilities and relationships in support of charitable causes, which exceed individual effort.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: Mediaweb Ltd
Copyright: © Copyright NZ Management magazine October 2006
Notes: Magazine article
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/7052
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