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Clinical and socioeconomic benefits of serological HLA-DR matching for renal transplantation over three eras of immunosuppression regimens at a single unit

Taylor, C.J., Welsh, K.I., Gray, C.M., Bunce, M., Bayne, A.M., Sutton, P.M., Gray, D.W., Ting, A. and Morris, P.J. (1993) Clinical and socioeconomic benefits of serological HLA-DR matching for renal transplantation over three eras of immunosuppression regimens at a single unit. Clinical Transplants, 1993 . pp. 233-241.

Abstract

The efficacy of HLA-DR matching in cadaveric renal transplantation is controversial in the cyclosporine (CsA) era. Reports have questioned both the reliability of serological HLA-DR typing as well as the benefit of matching in terms of improved graft survival. Analysis of 1,000 consecutive cadaver donor transplants performed at Oxford between 1975 and 1992 has shown that with improved immunosuppressive regimens and increased transplant success there has been a steadily diminishing influence of HLA-DR matching measured in terms of first graft outcome. For patients treated with azathioprine and prednisolone (n = 278) overall one-year first graft survival was 65%, but there was a 20% improvement associated with HLA-DR matching which has been maintained for up to 15 years. With the introduction of CsA, used either alone or in conjunction with low dose steroids (n = 96), one-year first graft survival was 69% and the difference between HLA-DR-matched and -mismatched transplants was 14%. Our current maintenance immunosuppressive protocol is triple therapy (N = 425) with an 81% one-year first graft survival for both matched and mismatched transplants. However, we do continue to find a marked correlation between HLA-DR matching and clinical course. HLA-DR-mismatched patients suffer more rejection episodes, spend a longer time in the hospital, and have higher creatinine levels at 3 months. This costs, on average, an extra 1,500 pounds for each mismatched transplant. The effect is most apparent in unsensitized males. For cadaveric regrafts, one-year graft survival for patients on triple therapy is 80% (n = 116) which does not differ from first graft survival rates.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Publisher: UCLA Tissue Typing Laboratory
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/5897
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