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Success, gender and academic voices. Consuming passion or selling the soul?

Harris, P., Thiele, B. and Currie, J. (1998) Success, gender and academic voices. Consuming passion or selling the soul? Gender and Education, 10 (2). pp. 133-148.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09540259820989
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Abstract

In 1995 a research team interviewed a cross-section of academics and senior managers in an Australian public university about their perception of the attributes of success. A number of different views emerged. Respondents who felt the system was reasonable saw the successful academic as someone who was productive, hard-working, strategic and able to adopt a university-wide perspective. Those who saw the system as flawed, identified success in negative terms, speaking of 'careerism' and selfishness. This group also spoke of institutional discrimination. These responses were differently articulated by senior managers, and by male and female, and senior and junior, academics. The article discusses these responses. It concludes with an analysis of the way gender constructs patterns of academic and managerial success within universities, and argues that in a profoundly gendered fashion production is privileged over reproduction and output over process.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Education
Publisher: Carfax Publishing Ltd
Copyright: 1998 Carfax Publishing Ltd
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/5559
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