Catalog Home Page

Asylum seekers: How attributions and emotion affect Australians' views on mandatory detention of “the other”

Hartley, L.K. and Pedersen, A. (2007) Asylum seekers: How attributions and emotion affect Australians' views on mandatory detention of “the other”. Australian Journal of Psychology, 59 (3). pp. 119-131.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Authors' Version
Download (238kB) | Preview
    Link to Published Version: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0004953...
    *Subscription may be required

    Abstract

    There is little research regarding the social psychological processes shaping community opinions about asylum seeker policy. Here, we explored two issues by way of a random community survey of the Perth metropolitan area. We first examined whether the intergroup perceptions that occur when individuals focus upon the Australian community (self-focus) or asylum seekers themselves (other-focus) when evaluating the issue of asylum seekers in detention affected community opinions. Regarding self-focus, perceiving the Australian community as stable (not seeing asylum seekers as a threat to the stability of Australian society) predicted a more lenient policy orientation, as did perceiving the government's policy as illegitimate. Regarding other-focus, perceiving asylum seekers as legitimate, their situation in detention as unstable, and empathy predicted a more lenient policy orientation. Second, we examined the accuracy with which participants estimated wider community consensus for their respective policy orientation. As predicted, over-estimation increased as participants favoured tougher policy.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Psychology
    Publisher: Australian Psychological Society
    Copyright: Australian Psychological Society
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/5555
    Item Control Page

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year