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Intraepithelial DNA immunisation with a plasmid encoding a codon optimised COPV E1 gene sequence, but not the wild-type gene sequence completely protects against mucosal challenge with infectious COPV in beagles

Moore, R.A., Parmar, V., Walcott, S.P, Gough, G.W., Stanley, M.A., Santos, E.B., Nicholls, P.K., White, K.L., Anderson, D.M., Lloyd, A., Topley, P., Romanos, M.A. and Thomsen, L. (2002) Intraepithelial DNA immunisation with a plasmid encoding a codon optimised COPV E1 gene sequence, but not the wild-type gene sequence completely protects against mucosal challenge with infectious COPV in beagles. Virology, 304 (2). pp. 451-459.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/viro.2002.1726
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Abstract

DNA plasmids encoding the open reading frames of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) nonstructural early genes E1, E2, or E7 protein were delivered into both oral mucosal and cutaneous epithelial sites in beagle dogs using particle-mediated immunotherapeutic delivery (PMID) technology. Control dogs were vaccinated with plasmid encoding either hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBVs) or COPV L1. Using a prophylactic immunisation protocol, a priming dose of plasmid DNA was followed by a booster dose 6 weeks later. Four weeks after boost, all dogs were challenged with infectious COPV particles. Following viral challenge, as shown previously (M. A. Stanley et al., 2001, Vaccine 19, 2783-2792), mucosal papillomas developed in the negative-control HBVs vaccinated dogs, but all animals in the COPV L1 group were fully protected from disease development. In the early gene-vaccinated groups five of six in the E1-vaccinated dogs, two of six in E2-vaccinated dogs, and three of six in the E7-vaccinated beagles developed oral papillomas. Compared to the HBVs negative-control group the oral papillomas that did develop in the early-gene vaccinated beagles were significantly smaller, shorter in duration, and fewer in number. Taken together the disease burden was markedly reduced and this was statistically significant. In a second experiment one group of animals was vaccinated with plasmid encoding the wild-type COPV E1 gene, and a separate group was vaccinated with plasmid encoding a synthetic codon-optimised COPV E1 gene sequence. None of the codon-optimised E1-vaccinated animals developed papillomas at any challenge site. However, all animals vaccinated with wild-type E1 had papillomas. These data suggest that immunisation by PMID with papillomavirus early genes can significantly impact upon subsequent disease development and that full protection can be achieved using improved vectors encoding codon-optimised gene sequences perhaps emphasizing the importance of antigen load in the generation of protective responses to papillomavirus proteins.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/553
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