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Amelioration of growth reduction of lowland rice caused by a temporary loss of soil-water saturation

Seng, V., Bell, R.W. and Willett, I.R. (2004) Amelioration of growth reduction of lowland rice caused by a temporary loss of soil-water saturation. Plant and Soil, 265 (1-2). pp. 1-16.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-005-0694-0
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Abstract

Decreases in nutrient availability after loss of soil-water saturation are significant constraints to productivity in lowland rainfed rice soils. The effectiveness of soil amendments like lime and straw in ameliorating these constraints are poorly understood. This pot experiment was conducted in Cambodia to investigate changes in soil chemical properties and nutrient uptake by rice after applying lime or straw to continuously flooded or intermittently flooded soil. In continuously flooded soils, exchangeable Al decreased to below 0.2 cmolc/kg. Liming (pH 6.5–6.8) the continuously flooded soil decreased the levels of acetate extractable Fe and P, plant P uptake and shoot dry matter, but had no effect on either Bray-1 or Olsen extractable P values. By contrast, the addition of straw (3.5 g dry straw/kg soil) increased Bray-1, Olsen, and acetate extractable P, plant P uptake, shoot P, and shoot dry matter. The non-amended soils became strongly acidic after loss of soil water saturation: extractable Al increased to 1.0 cmolc/kg, a potentially harmful level for rice. By contrast, extractable P decreased markedly under loss of soil water saturation as did plant P uptake, shoot P, and shoot dry matter. With loss of soil water saturation, liming substantially depressed the levels of Al but it did not increase plant P uptake, shoot P, and shoot dry matter. Straw addition not only decreased extractable Al levels to well below 0.6 cmolc/kg under loss of soil water saturation, but it also increased extractability of soil P, plant P uptake, shoot P, and shoot dry matter. Thus, in rainfed environments, the incorporation of straw may be more effective than liming to pH 6.8 for minimising the negative effects of temporary loss of soil-water saturation on P availability, P uptake, and growth of rice.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Environmental Science
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright: 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/5485
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