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Canola oil increases in polyunsaturated fatty acids and decreases in oleic acid in drought-stressed Mediterranean-type environments

Aslam, M.N., Nelson, M.N., Kailis, S.G., Bayliss, K.L., Speijers, J. and Cowling, W.A. (2009) Canola oil increases in polyunsaturated fatty acids and decreases in oleic acid in drought-stressed Mediterranean-type environments. Plant Breeding, 128 (4). pp. 348-355.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1439-0523.2008.01577.x
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    Abstract

    Seed fatty acid (FA) composition, oil and protein (meal) was assessed on five canola (Brassica napus) varieties in 14 cropping environments in southern Australia, including several low rainfall drought-stressed environments. We modelled the relationship between seed quality attributes and growing season rainfall and temperature using a linear mixed model. Variance components for variety and years within locations were relatively large, but variance components for variety × environment interaction were small or insignificant for most seed quality traits. Mean oleic acid content varied from 57% in ‘Surpass 300TT’ to 62% in ‘ATR-Beacon’. As growing season rainfall decreased from 300 mm (moderate) to 150 mm (severe drought stress), mean oleic acid decreased by 3.8%, linoleic acid increased by 2.0%, linolenic acid increased by 1.7%, and saturated FA decreased by 0.4%. Seed oil (% dry weight) decreased by 3.2% and protein in meal (% dry weight) increased by 3.9% across the same rainfall range. High oleic acid composition was associated with higher rainfall and cooler average minimum and maximum temperatures during the growing season.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
    Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Inc.
    Copyright: 2009 The Authors
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/5272
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