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A welfare approach for captive wild birds

von Dietze, E., Napier, K.R., McWhorter, T.J. and Fleming, P.A. (2009) A welfare approach for captive wild birds. In: Australian & New Zealand Council for the Care of Animals in Research & Teaching (ANZCCART) (2009), 28 - 30 July, Port Douglas, Queensland

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    Abstract

    Working with captive wild birds presents researchers with a multitude of challenges. Not least of these is appropriate cage size. Previous studies have highlighted some AEC concerns in this area. Our AEC has worked with a research group to ensure improved outcomes for captive wild birds in a specific study as well as for future studies. This involved the redesign of an outdoor aviary for the latest cohort of birds (n=8). The re-design includes 8 individual aviaries with sufficient space to allow flight for small birds (<150 g). The birds have been taught to feed in smaller cages within the aviaries so that they are easily re-caught and can be handled for the research. The capacity to reduce the aviary size for trial participation has also been incorporated, allowing researchers to conduct experiments with minimal handling of the birds. Current occupants (Silvereyes, ~10 g) appear to have adapted well. The AEC has also endeavoured to set some guidelines for the time space between the various components of the research so that the birds are provided with time frames free from research interaction in the aviaries. The student researcher has been proactive in including remote monitoring through cameras as well as through nearby windows, and has recently implemented a remote design to close the smaller cages. This session will discuss the process and evaluate its outcomes to date.

    Publication Type: Conference Paper
    Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4812
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