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Sex and the single (-eared) female: leg function, limb autotomy and mating history trade-offs in field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus)

Bateman, P.W. and Fleming, P.A. (2006) Sex and the single (-eared) female: leg function, limb autotomy and mating history trade-offs in field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). Biology Letters, 2 (1). pp. 33-35.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2005.0408
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Abstract

Both male and female field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) autotomize front (tympanal) limbs more slowly than hind limbs. Arguably, this pattern could reflect possible differences in the mechanism of limb autotomy. However, we demonstrate that, for females, limb autotomy is also dependent on their mating status: virgin females autotomize front legs significantly more slowly than mated females. This response suggests a central control for leg autotomy in these animals, and less readiness to autotomize a front leg, possibly because the tympanum is crucial for mate location.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: The Royal Society
Copyright: © 2005 The Royal Society.
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4714
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