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The role of fire in tuart decline at Yalgorup?

Archibald, R., Bowen, B., Hardy, G., McCaw, L. and Close, D. (2006) The role of fire in tuart decline at Yalgorup? Tuart Bulletin, 6 . pp. 1-4.

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    Abstract

    The tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala) woodlands of Yalgorup have a long history of grazing and frequent, low intensity burning. The local Aboriginal population burnt the undergrowth as often as every two to four years to assist hunting and promote good grazing conditions for their marsupial prey. Similar land management practices were continued by European cattle graziers until State forest and national park areas were declared (around 1930 and 1970 respectively). In recent decades, prescribed burning has occurred every 10 to 20 years in the State forest and intense wildfire has occurred infrequently in the national park. During this period, the understorey has increased in density and the condition of the tuart canopy has declined. This raises the question as to whether there is a link between altered fire regimes, understorey density and tuart decline at Yalgorup.

    Publication Type: Others
    Murdoch Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health
    Publisher: Tuart Health Research Group, Murdoch University
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4597
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