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Reforestation in Cambodia: the use of seeds

So, T., Dell, B. and Ruthrof, K. (2009) Reforestation in Cambodia: the use of seeds. In: 19th Conference of the Society of Ecological Restoration International, 24 - 26 August, Perth, Western Australia.

Abstract

In Cambodia, deforestation at 0.5% (100,000 ha) pa, seriously threatens biodiversity and the livelihood of communities. In recognizing the negative impacts caused by deforestation, the government has issued policies encouraging tree planting. This has resulted in an increase in revegetation effort, from 1,000 ha in the early 2000s to 8,000 ha in 2008, with seeds being the main planting material. However, the quality of seeds being used is questionable. Although there are a few indentified seed sources in natural forests, access is limited due to the remote location and/or the lack of a seed distribution system. Frequently, seeds are collected from unidentified sources, and most often seeds are not available locally, especially those of the high-value timber species. The quality of seeds used in Cambodia is recognized to be poor since there is no tree improvement program. Recently a few hectares of seed production areas of a few species have been established, but have not yet produced seeds. The only seeds that are certified are those that are sourced outside the country, mainly fast-growing exotic species. With an increase in tree planting programs, the availability of good quality seed has to be considered as it is a prerequisite for success in this sector. Seed production areas or seedling seed orchards for priority species have to be established locally especially those of recalcitrant seeds which can not be stored for long periods. In addition, a seed distribution system has to be put in place to facilitate access to quality seeds.

Publication Type: Conference Item
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4524
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