Catalog Home Page

Ecological, economic and social challenges, restoration filters and planning for the unknown

Ruthrof, K.X. and Valentine, L.E. (2010) Ecological, economic and social challenges, restoration filters and planning for the unknown. Australasian Plant Conservation, 19 (3). pp. 34-35.

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (829kB) | Preview

    Abstract

    Since European settlement, large areas of public lands in Australia have been degraded by various anthropogenic disturbances. An example is the Ludlow Tuart Forest (2049 ha), located approximately 200 km south of Perth in Western Australia. This forest is also representative of many of the Tuart (Eucalyptus gomphocephala) forests and woodlands in the region, which were logged in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, subject to cattle grazing since the early 1900s and to mining since the early 2000s. These, and other threatening processes have led to invasion by non-endemic species such as Arum Lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica) and Annual Veldt Grass (Ehrharta longifolia), poor levels of Tuart recruitment, and low levels of understorey diversity and abundance (DEC 2007).

    This large-scale degradation has led to a growing desire from the community, conservationists, scientists and land managers to develop techniques to restore public lands such as the Ludlow Tuart Forest. However, restoration faces some interesting challenges, many of which can be explained though ecological, economic and social challenge.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: Centre of Excellence for Climate Change and Forest and Woodland Health
    Publisher: Australian Network for Plant Conservation Inc.
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4519
    Item Control Page

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year