Catalog Home Page

Research into natural and induced resistance in Australian native vegetation of Phytophthora cinnamomi and innovative methods to contain and/or eradicate within localised incursions in areas of high biodiversity in Australia. Does the physiological status of the plant at the time of spraying affect the efficacy of phosphite?

Hüberli, D., Shearer, B.L., Calver, M.C., Paap, T., Moore, N.A., Barrett, S., Freebury, G., Howard, K., O'Gara, E., Dunstan, W., Bowen, B., Gower, K., Palmer, B., Long, N., Crane, C., Spadek, T., Dell, B., O'Brien, P., McComb, J.A. and Hardy, G.E.St.J. (2008) Research into natural and induced resistance in Australian native vegetation of Phytophthora cinnamomi and innovative methods to contain and/or eradicate within localised incursions in areas of high biodiversity in Australia. Does the physiological status of the plant at the time of spraying affect the efficacy of phosphite? Prepared by the Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management for the Australian Government Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts..

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Download (3402kB) | Preview

    Abstract

    Phosphite is of major importance in controlling root disease caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi. It acts both directly and indirectly on the pathogen. In order to maximise the efficacy of phosphite we need to understand how the physiological status of the plant at the time of phosphite application affects control. The physiological status of plants is not constant but varies over time depending on developmental gene expression (e.g. leaf phenology, flowering/fruiting and senescence) and interactions with the environment (e.g. temperature, moisture, light, fire, nutrients and other biota). In Mediterranean environments in particular, plants experience stresses due to extremes in water availability and the incidence of wild fire is high. Furthermore, individuals and species of plants are not in synchrony due to differences in recruitment, ontogeny, longevity and rest periods. Therefore, from a management perspective when considering all of these stresses native plant communities are subjected to, it is critical to know when to apply phosphite to ensure optimal disease control.

    We examined each of the key environmental stresses (water excess, water deficit, fire and flowering) independently, on the efficacy of phosphite to control disease.

    Publication Type: Report
    Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management
    Publisher: Prepared by the Centre for Phytophthora Science and Management for the Australian Government Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts.
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4328
    Item Control Page

    Downloads

    Downloads per month over past year