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Porcine circovirus-associated disease in weaner pigs in Western Australia

O'Dea, M.A., Kabay, M.J., Carr, J., Wilcox, G.E. and Richards, R.B. (2011) Porcine circovirus-associated disease in weaner pigs in Western Australia. Australian Veterinary Journal, 89 (4). pp. 122-130.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.2010.00680.x
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Abstract

Objective
To report the occurrence and pathology of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated disease (PCVAD) of postweaning pigs in two Australian pig herds.

Methods
Mortality data from two commercial piggeries that experienced higher than normal postweaning illthrift and mortalities were examined. Gross and histopathological examinations were performed on the index cases, and at weekly intervals thereafter for a period of 10 weeks. Specimens were submitted to the laboratory for routine diagnostic testing and for exclusion of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The genomes of two strains of PCV2 isolated during testing were sequenced.

Results
Mortality rates in weaned, 5-12-week-old pigs spiked significantly during mid to late 2007. This increase in the mortalities was mainly attributed to salmonella-associated diarrhoea and illthrift. Salmonellosis was diagnosed in 73/110 cases inclusive of both piggeries. Many pigs also had chronic granulomatous lymphadenitis and diffuse histiocytic interstitial pneumonia consistent with PCVAD and associated with varying amounts of PCV2 antigen and inclusion bodies. All samples tested for PRRSV were negative. Sequence analysis of the PCV2 isolates showed strain differences between piggeries.

Conclusion
This report describes the first outbreaks of PCVAD in growing pigs in Western Australia (WA) and describes lesions not previously seen in this laboratory. It also describes the first isolation of a PCV2 group 1 virus in WA associated with PCVAD. Although the outbreaks of PCVAD occurred with concurrent salmonellosis, the two diseases were unrelated. Neither of the outbreaks met the Australian case definition for the diagnosis of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4216
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