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Hepatotoxicosis in dogs consuming a diet of camel meat contaminated with indospicine

FitzGerald, L., Fletcher, M.T., Paul, A.E.H., Mansfield, C.S. and O'Hara, A.J. (2011) Hepatotoxicosis in dogs consuming a diet of camel meat contaminated with indospicine. Australian Veterinary Journal, 89 (3). pp. 95-100.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.2010.00684.x
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Abstract

Background: Four dogs presented with clinical signs of severe hepatic disease after consuming a commercial camel meat diet. Methods: Laboratory investigation revealed evidence of severe liver disease, including markedly increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity and total bilirubin concentration, and prolonged clotting times. Results: Two dogs deteriorated despite supportive therapy and were euthanased. Histologically, both livers appeared similar, with the main lesion being extensive periacinar necrosis and haemorrhage. Indospicine, a toxic amino acid of plant origin, was detected in the serum and/or plasma from all four dogs, as well as in tissues of a dog that was necropsied and in a sample of the camel meat fed to this animal. Serum biochemistry tests using blood samples collected from 15 additional dogs identified as having eaten the diet detected indospicine was in the serum of 14 and 3 had increased ALT activity. One of the latter dogs subsequently developed clinical signs of severe liver disease and was euthanased. Conclusion: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first published report of the detection of indospicine residues in camel meat and the occurrence of severe, sometimes fatal, liver disease in dogs that consumed this contaminated meat.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Copyright: © 2011 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/4095
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