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Influence of HLA-DRB1 allele heterogeneity on disease risk and clinical course in a West Australian MS cohort: a high-resolution genotyping study

Wu, J.S., James, I., Wei, Q., Castley, A., Christiansen, F.T., Carroll, W.M., Mastaglia, F.L. and Kermode, A.G. (2010) Influence of HLA-DRB1 allele heterogeneity on disease risk and clinical course in a West Australian MS cohort: a high-resolution genotyping study. Multiple Sclerosis, 16 (5). pp. 526-532.

Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1352458510362997
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Abstract

Background: Previous studies on the influence of HLA-DRB1 alleles on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and clinical course have mostly employed the 2-point genotyping method. Objective: To assess the influence of HLA-DRB1 alleles and allele interactions on disease risk and clinical course in a large West Australian MS patient cohort using high-resolution genotyping. Methods: Four digit HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed on a group of 466 clinically definite or probable MS patients from the Perth Demyelinating Diseases Database and 189 healthy Caucasian controls from the Busselton Community Health Study. Results: In addition to the known risk allele HLA-DRB1*1501, evidence of increased susceptibility to MS was found for three additional alleles, DRB1*0405, DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1303, though the power was insufficient to sustain significance for these when crudely Bonferroni corrected over all alleles considered. DRB1*0701 was found to be protective even after correction for multiple comparisons. In addition we found evidence that the DRB1*04 sub-allele HLA-DRB1*0407 and HLA-DRB1*0901 may be protective. Among the diplotypes, the highest estimated risk was in HLA-DRB1*1501/*0801 heterozygotes and DRB1*1501 homozygotes and the lowest in HLA-DRB1*0701/*0101 heterozygotes. There was no significant gender association with HLA-DRB1*1501 overall, but the HLA-DRB1*1501/*1104 risk genotype was significantly associated with female gender. HLA-DRB1*1501 was the strongest risk allele in both primary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the advantages of high-resolution HLA genotyping in recognizing risk-modifying alleles and allele combinations in this patient cohort and in recognizing the differential effects of HLA-DRB1*04 and DRB1*11 sub-alleles.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Murdoch Affiliation: Centre for Clinical Immunology and Biomedical Statistics
Publisher: SAGE Publications
Copyright: © 2010 The Author(s).
URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3683
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