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Effect of Australian sweet lupin (Lupinus angustifoliusL.) inclusion levels and enzyme supplementation on the performance, carcass composition and meat quality of grower/finisher pigs

Kim, J.C., Mullan, B.P., Nicholls, R.R. and Pluske, J.R. (2011) Effect of Australian sweet lupin (Lupinus angustifoliusL.) inclusion levels and enzyme supplementation on the performance, carcass composition and meat quality of grower/finisher pigs. Animal Production Science, 51 (1). pp. 37-43.

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    Link to Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AN10087
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    Abstract

    Two hundred and twenty-four crossbred male pigs (Large White× Landrace, initial bodyweight 27.2 kg ± 0.22) were used to determine the influence of dietary Australian sweet lupin (ASL) inclusion level and enzyme supplementation on growth performance, carcass composition and meat quality. The experiment was a 4 × 2 factorial design with the respective factors being ASL inclusion level (Lupinus angustifolius L., cv. Mandelup; 200, 250, 300 and 350 g/kg, in replacement of soybean meal) and enzyme supplementation (without or with supplemental enzyme; Allzyme SSF). Pigs (7 pigs per pen × 4 replicates per treatment = 28 pigs per enzyme by lupin-level combination) were fed grower diets between 27 and 50 kg, finisher diets between 50 and 75 kg and pre-sale diets between 75 and 107 kg, and daily gain and feed intake were measured weekly. At ∼107 kg liveweight, the pigs were slaughtered at a commercial abattoir and carcass composition was measured. Meat quality (pH, surface exudate, drip loss, cooking loss, meat colour and shear force) was measured from selected pigs (n = 18) fed the lowest and highest lupin diets without enzyme supplementation. Increasing the ASL inclusion level to 350 g/kg did not alter (P > 0.05) growth performance of pigs and did not influence (P > 0.05) carcass composition and meat quality. Likewise, addition of supplemental enzyme had no effect (P > 0.05) on growth performance and carcass composition. Lack of performance response to added enzyme complex is likely due either to the use of enzyme complex that was not substrate-specific for the lupin non-starch polysaccharides or to the high specification of the experimental diets, which was inevitable when increasing inclusion levels of lupins. The results show that a current variety (Mandelup) of ASL can be used in grower/finisher diets up to 350 g/kg without compromising growth, carcass composition or meat quality of pigs.

    Publication Type: Journal Article
    Murdoch Affiliation: Animal Research Institute
    School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences
    Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
    Copyright: (c) CSIRO
    URI: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/id/eprint/3667
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